The Omicron Matter – Knowledge Discovered – Rachael and What to Look for


A new entry in the Omicron Matter – Knowledge Discovered. Rachael leads the team in explain what the drone should be looking for in the pond. There was a power source, Leyden jars, and other strange items.  As Millicent hears the list, she becomes more agitated. Jason’s suggestions completely unnerve her.

For those of you who are new to the Omicron Matter, the home page is a good place to start.

Look for more tomorrow.

Author’s Note

This the second book in “The Finder’s Saga.” A remarkable testament to my ego that I should write so much to be read by so few. The first book, the Recruiting Matter, begins with a Prologue. My long suffering editor complained that I never explained what an Omicron was and we were left hanging a bit as to where Jason’s Parents ended up. Those loose ends are starting to be tied up.  However, as hard as it is for me to understand, some of you who are reading now MAY not have read the early work.  That’s ok, one hopes this is working “standalone” well enough. But the descriptions of what the team is seeing has its roots in the Prologue which I am providing a link to. I am also providing a link to the Recruiting Matter Home Page because some of you on the East Coast may have a surfeit of free time whilst waiting for the snow plows to bury your cars.

Prologue – Dunstable – 1840

The Recruiting Matter

 

Rachael – What to look for

“What are we looking for?” Millicent asked.

Rachael said, “A great honking power source. It seems they found a way to harness lightning. I asked Stephan and Jolene. Apparently there was terrible lightning storm the night of …” she waved to the wreckage of the house, “So they were probably using lightning rods…several of them if my reading is right. If the pond was where the lab was, there should be the remnants of glass jars.”

Jason supplied, “Leyden jars [1]. They would regulate the surges of electricity from the bolts of lightning.  The lightning rods would be the collectors and the jars would be the storage units. At least for a few moments.”

Millicent called over Michael, “Michael , look for lightning rods around the house and then look for cables that run to the pond.”

Rachael continued, “The central device created a field with a set of rotating bands of metal. I strongly suspect those bands are the key to understanding what Jason’s parents were doing. “

Simone said, “The bands were a combination of strange metals.  The metals were blue  just like the water but these metals were a dark blue – the hue of indigo.”

Millicent hissed to herself, “Where did they find enough of that?”

Simone asked excitedly, “You know this material? It defies explanation.”

Millicent closed her eyes and put her fingers on her temples and said, “We need to expand your boundaries of explanation a bit.”

Simone folded her arms, but said nothing more. Jason said, “The field generated was strange in that it would have disrupted normal forces such as gravity. I would look for odd circular marks on the walls or floor to determine the range of the field.”

Millicent began pacing along the edge of the pool and said quietly, “Damn. How did he manage that here? They really did make one. Alright Charles do you have enough to start?”

Charles voice came from the notebook, “Yes, I have enough to start. I will project so you and others can guide the drone.”

Millicent acknowledged Charles message and looked for a bench to sit on. Jason followed her and then asked, “You were upset by our discoveries. What did they make? What did they do?”

Millicent sat down with her shoulders slumped as she watched the saw be positioned for a second cut. She said, “They made something they shouldn’t have. And they were noisy about it.”

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[1] Leyden Jars “stored” static electricity between two conducting materials and glass. They were discovered by Pieter Von Musshenbroek of Leiden (Leyden) and were named after the town.

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